This Is How We Know There Are Two Trillion Galaxies In The Universe

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When you gaze up at the night sky, through the veil of stars and the plane of the Milky Way close by, you can’t help but feel small before the grand abyss of the Universe that lies beyond. Even though nearly all of them are invisible to our eyes, our observable Universe, extending tens of billions of light years in all directions, contains a fantastically large number of galaxies within it.

Just how many galaxies are out there used to be a mystery, with estimates rising from the thousands to the millions to the billions, all as telescope technology improved. If we made the most straightforward estimate using today’s best technology, we’d state there are 170 billion galaxies in our Universe. But we know more than that, and our modern estimate is even grander: two trillion galaxies. Here’s how we got there. science space science on earth science

In an ideal world, we’d simply count them all. We’d point our telescopes at the sky, cover the entire thing, collect every photon emitted our way, and detect every object that was out there, no matter how faint. With arbitrarily good technology and an infinite amount of resources, we’d simply measure everything in the Universe, and that would teach us how many galaxies are out there. science space science on earth science

But in practice, that won’t work. Our telescopes are limited in size, which in turn limits how many photons they can collect and the resolutions they can achieve. There’s a trade-off between how faint an object you can see and how much of the sky you can take in at once. Some of the Universe is obscured by intervening matter. And the more distant an object is, the fainter it appears; at some point, a source is far enough away that even observing for a century won’t reveal such a galaxy. science space science on earth science

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